One Manga Shuts Down to Avoid Legal Woes

One Manga Shuts Down to Avoid Legal Woes

| 22 Comments

One Manga Shut Down Closure

Online manga provider One Manga is one of the first big sites to voluntarily shut down operations following a joint statement released by Japanese publishers and their foreign licensees that they aim to stamp out scanlations and the illegal distribution of manga on the internet.

Manga publishers and their overseas partners have been plagued with sluggish sales for two years in a row, and they blame the phenomenon on the easy and free accessibility of their oftentimes illegally uploaded material on the web.

There are literally thousands of free manga servers and scanlation sites operating on the internet, with many of the largest sites getting up to millions of hits per day. The high volume of internet traffic converts into a significant ad revenue for some of these sites, which make them prime targets for Cease and Desist orders by the copyright holders of the content they are distributing without a license.

The coalition’s next target is scanlation circles — groups of fans who scan, translate, and distribute manga without a license, although some publishers like DMP would like to work with these circles as subcontractors for creating and distributing licensed titles. DMP hopes to create a new distribution channel that promotes profit-sharing between the official overseas license holders, the scanlation circles who will be working on the titles, and the original authors and publishers in Japan.

Thanks to Wildquaker for the heads-up.

Author: magnetic_rose

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22 Comments

  1. That is just sooo sad T^T

  2. sad yes, but i don’t exactly blame the publishers >.> although i have to say, i am a little leery of the whole “blame the scanlations for the bad sales” thing.

    after all, the entire world economy contracted over the last two years; it sounds like they may be using scanlations as a scapegoat to explain lackluster sales.

  3. nooooooooooooooooooooooooo!!!!!!!

    *cue music*

    lol

    i was just reading a chapter there some hours ago….*sob sob* this is just…sad
    your right about the scapegoat thing i think…if nothing else, scanlations usually entice the fans to buy the manga; just that they’re not always available (lalo na sa pinas) …

    hay… magtalukbong muna ko ng kumot > <

    • scanlations usually entice the fans to buy the manga

      this is true — at least in my case; half the manga i currently own i bought after reading the scanlation.

      i mean, sure scanlations are free and in english — but i really prefer manga in may hands and in japanese LOL

  4. i guess intellectual property enforcement is really starting to get going nowadays.

    tsk.. the “knowledge economies” are obviously trying to set the pace

  5. i don’t blame the publishers for trying to recoup lost investments. i just wish they provided the manga fans with a viable alternative to online manga servers and free scanlations. online manga subcriptions and better translations for tankoubon will do a lot more for the industry than just persecuting scanlation circles and free manga sites >.>

  6. Whoa. 90% of my manga collection was a direct result of reading the scanlations. There’s just no way to know which manga would appeal to you without having a read first.

    If anything, this could mean that I will be able to save more money because I won’t be able to find new manga titles to obsess over and collect XD

    • on the flip side, there is now a larger probability that you’ll purchase a tankoubon off the shelf only to find out later that it’s crap >.> that’s money wasted instead of money saved.

  7. Stupid move. Stupid, stupid move. This is going to generate a lot of hate toward the manga industry, which is bad for business. Also, their logic is loopy: 2 years ago is when they noticed their sales dipping? No, really? Just like everyone else? Obviously the problem is scanlations! It CAN’T have anything to do with the start of a global economic downturn.

    • It CAN’T have anything to do with the start of a global economic downturn.

      IKR. and honestly, these past couple of years people have more important things to pay for than overpriced, badly-translated licensed manga.

  8. This is just too sad!!! T_T

    Online scanlations are people’s basis before buying an original manga. You don’t want to spend too much on a manga only to find out that it’s crap! Also, mangas become more popular because of the online scanlations because they are more accessible and you can easily see them on the net.

    I couldn’t blame the mangakas the publishers and all behind this but I wish that they’ll provide an alternative for us manga fans or make it cheaper.

  9. I couldn’t blame the mangakas the publishers and all behind this but I wish that they’ll provide an alternative for us manga fans or make it cheaper.

    exactly — it would be more productive all around if they came up with a way to lure free manga readers into paid services or buying books by upping the quality and lowering prices, instead of closing sites left and right.

  10. come on, they gonna take away my only means to read manga, this is the foreign investors fault damn Americans, first ruining naruto for making it a very stupid child like anime, i bet the Japanese doesnt care for scanalation but the american and their money grubing ways influence the publisher of these mangas..

    • they gonna take away my only means to read manga, this is the foreign investors fault damn

      if it’s your only means of reading manga, perhaps the coalition was right in closing down free manga sites? sorry, but your statement makes me feel uncomfortable. unlike the other comments left here by people who actually go out and buy manga after sampling them on a free site, you sound like you rely completely on “free” manga and have no intention of supporting the authors and series you claim to be a fan off by purchasing their books.

  11. I have no knowledge of how Japanese publishers go about this, but I betcha they don’t “not care for scanlation”. Manga artists and writers need to earn money too, and if publishers are hurting, you can bet the creative side gets hurt financially as well.

    You should consider yourself very lucky that there are sites and groups who take it upon themselves to scanlate. Back when manga wasn’t so popular to the English speaking world, there were only a few publishers releasing any manga (Viz & Dark Horse, I think?), and that was about less than twenty titles.

    As much as a loathe the loss of sites like OneManga, I’m with everyone else who understands why it’s happening, but hope that the publishers would go about it some other way that’ll make everyone happy.

  12. What annoys me is that this limits my reading list of unlicensed manga. My Japanese is limited to fangirl Japanese so I rely on scanlators for my fix of unlicensed manga. I’d buy the Japanese version if I can. I can, but I won’t be able to read it.

    Like a lot of people who comment before me, my flimsy manga collection comes from being impressed with the manga after I read a scanlation. At least Square Enix is making the effort to deliver digital manga by the fall. (http://www.square-enix.com/na/manga/) Still, it’s limited. I don’t know if people outside of North America will have access to this like Crunchyroll.

    I find it ironic that these American distributors of anime and manga admit that they rely on internet buzz from subbers and scanlators when choosing the titles that they will buy rights to. Then, they choose to blame them for poor sales over the possibilities of a bad world economy, poor translation and pooorer choice in titles, and overhead expenses that make their anime and manga inaccessible to the limited purchasing power of the proverbial twelve-year old. The population of twenty-/thirty-somethings like us who have the means to buy is not that large.

    • I find it ironic that these American distributors of anime and manga admit that they rely on internet buzz from subbers and scanlators when choosing the titles that they will buy rights to. Then, they choose to blame them for poor sales over the possibilities of a bad world economy, poor translation and pooorer choice in titles, and overhead expenses that make their anime and manga inaccessible…

      hear, hear — i too find it ironic that scanlation circles seem to have better taste in manga than commercial licensees. also — although the publishers coalition is right about scanlations, it is only correct up to a certain extent, and all this scapegoating is unwarranted.

  13. thats too bad…..

  14. it was through onemanga…. that i owe them my collections right now… D.N.ANGEL i love it very much… was able to browse a little bit before selecting the one that will fit your taste.. i owe it all to those scanlations..

    Sayang talaga… :) pero they really earned it..

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